Author Archives: Jesse Cumming

Exploring lenticular Kodacolor

The use of colour in film remains one of the longest and richest currents in the history of motion pictures. From tinting to toning, filmmakers have tried several incredible techniques to introduce colour into moving images almost since the medium’s beginnings. One special process that developed after a few decades was Kodak Kodacolor, which utilized lenticular technology to create a three-tone colour representation. Only produced for four years from 1928-1932[1], the Archives is lucky to house some of these rare and special films.

Lenticular Kodacolor under 6.4x magnification. Photo by Jesse Cumming.

Looking directly at the film with a naked eye, it appears no different than regular black and white 16mm film. This is because the colour information is encoded into a black and white film: no coloured dyes are used. Continue reading

Vintage Vancouver: Archival film from the City of Vancouver Archives

The City of Vancouver Archives is happy to announce Vintage Vancouver: Archival Film from the City of Vancouver Archives, November 18th 2012 at 2pm. This is the third in a series of screenings in collaboration with Vancity Theatre, exhibiting some of the finest selections from our moving images. Although you can view most of our moving images online, this is an exciting opportunity to see vintage Vancouver on the big screen with the advantage of curation, historical commentary, live accompaniment and the ability to share and laugh with a movie-loving audience (and maybe treat yourself to some popcorn).

Women in sailor suits in the Orpheum theatre, advertising the 1946 musical “Meet the Navy”. Reference Code: AM1184-S1-: CVA 1184-2292

Continue reading

And…Action! On set in the Archives Reading Room.

Here at the Archives, we’re used to working with pre-existing documents and media, though we recently decided to try our hand at creating something new. The idea arose to make a video introducing and promoting our public reading room, which is open for anyone to come and conduct research.

The first step was to find inspiration. Prior to our new video, proper Reading Room protocol had been communicated through a series of humorous “Dos” and “Don’ts” photos. We loved the way it was fun and tongue-in-cheek while getting the important facts across.

This series of posters created by the then-Public Archives of Canada (now Library and Archives Canada) shows good and bad Reading Room behavior. Don’t behave like the gorilla!

One other work we enjoyed while preparing this video was created by our friend and colleague at the United Church of Canada BC Conference Archives, the late Bob Stewart, entitled “The Archives – More than a Holding Operation”. The title makes its way into a line in our video, our own little tribute. Unlike Bob, our Archives does not have access to a choir – and none of us can boast rapping skills (well, one of our interns, but we could not convince her to go on camera). Continue reading

Your favourite Archives now on Facebook! What’s not to “like”?

At the Archives we are continually working on our social media outreach initiatives. It is something we do off the sides of our desks that has great value in reaching beyond the walls of the Archives and sharing our holdings with a wider audience often in new ways. This past summer the Archives was pleased to have a Communications intern from Concordia University helping us improve and expand our social media activities, Jesse Cumming. Jesse worked on many projects during the two months he was in Vancouver and you will see many of the fruits of his labour featured in blog posts this fall. Continue reading