New in the Public Domain for 2014

On January 1st, while we were singing Auld Lang Syne, the copyright expired for some of our holdings: they are now in the public domain in Canada. This means that they are no longer restricted to being viewed only at the Archives, but are available online to all. Here’s a quick look at what’s become easier to view and re-use.

This is a 2-reel documentary made by CBC in 1963 to be broadcast as part of The Morning Show. It contains footage of the recreational activities—such as carpet bowling, women’s Christmas crafts, and Judo—that take place at the Kerrisdale Community Centre as well as interviews with the centre’s instructors, users, and administrators.Morning show” – Kerrisdale Community Centre part #1, reference code VPK-S652-: MI-114 and “Morning show” – Kerrisdale Community Centre part #2, reference code VPK-S652-: MI-115.

This is another 2-reel documentary made by CBC in 1963 for The Morning Show. The first reel covers a visit to Stanley Park for a conversation with Stuart Lefeaux, Superintendent of Parks, and a visit to Queen Elizabeth Park, including footage of Century Rock, a time capsule located there that is to be opened in 2054. The second reel contains further discussion of Stanley Park and Queen Elizabeth Park, footage of Nelson Park, and remarks from Grace McCarthy, Parks Board Commissioner. “Morning show” Park Board part #1, reference code VPK-S652-: MI-116 and “Morning show” Park Board part #2, reference code VPK-S652-: MI-117.

Bull standing in a field

Grauer bull at Fraser Dairy, Sea Island. Photographer W.J. Moore. Reference code AM54-S4-: Misc N59.1.

It has been 50 years since the death of photographer W.J. Moore, so all his photographs, not just the ones taken before 1949, are in the public domain. Above is one of three images of a bull at Fraser Dairy (AM54-S4-: Misc N59.1, AM54-S4-: Misc N59.2 and AM54-S4-: Misc N59.3) that are available. We’ve written before about W.J. Moore, his panoramic camera, and our project to digitize his panoramic images.

The last trip of the B.C. Electric Railway observation car No. 124. Photographer Harry Bullen. Reference code AM54-S4-: Trans P122.

The last trip of the B.C. Electric Railway observation car No. 124. Photographer Harry Bullen. Reference code AM54-S4-: Trans P122.

Harry Bullen, official photographer for the B.C. Electric Railway Company, also died in 1963. Major Matthews’ notes with this photographic print are:

Observation Car, the last trip; 17th Sept. 1950

For fifty one [which he later corrected to 40] summers the celebrated “Observation Car”, B.C. Electric Railway Company street car No. 124, carried tens of thousands of sight-seeing passengers. It is estimated that, during the half century, it carried a million and a half passengers; her very popular conductor, “Teddy” Lyons, was a notable personality, known to travellers from all parts of the world. He talked continuously, and with much humour, as he descr4ibed the numerous objects of interest passed during the long trip of about two hours through all parts of the City. When street cars gave way to busses, i.e. rails to rubber, the street car tracks were torn up, the B.C. Electric Railway Company gave one last ride, complimentary, to civic dignitaries, then offered it as a relic to anyone who wanted it, which no one did. In 1955 the “Observation Car” was in Montreal. It came to Vancouver in the summer of 1910.

We hope you find these items useful.

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